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Lewis v. L.B. Dynasty

Supreme Court of South Carolina

March 18, 2015

LeAndra Lewis, Petitioner,
v.
L.B. Dynasty, d/b/a Boom Boom Room Studio 54 and S.C. Uninsured Employers' Fund, Defendants, of Whom S.C. Uninsured Employers' Fund is, Respondent

Heard January 14, 2015

Appeal from The Workers' Compensation Commission. Appellate Case No. 2012-213376.

REVERSED AND REMANDED.

Charles B. Burnette, III, of Burnette & Payne, PA, of Rock Hill; John S. Nichols and Blake A. Hewitt, both of Bluestein, Nichols, Thompson & Delgado, LLC, of Columbia, for Petitioner.

Lisa C. Glover, of Columbia, for Respondent.

Page 394

[411 S.C. 639] ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE COURT OF APPEALS

HEARN, JUSTICE

LeAndra Lewis was injured by an errant bullet at Studio 54 Boom Boom Room (the Club) while she was working as an exotic dancer. The question before the Court is whether she is an employee of the Club and thus eligible for workers' compensation. Considering the relationship in toto, we find the Club exercised control over the manner in which she performed her work and therefore conclude she was an employee.

FACTUAL/PROCEDURAL BACKGROUND

Lewis worked as an exotic dancer, performing five to seven days a week. Lewis traveled throughout North and South Carolina to dance at different establishments, and performed at the Club on three separate occasions. Upon arrival at the Club, Lewis presented identification demonstrating she was old enough to perform, reviewed the Club's rule sheet, and paid a tip-out fee. The tip-out fee, which was determined based on when her shift started, was $70.

The types of dances Lewis performed at the Club included V.I.P. dances, table dances, and dances on the stage. Lewis was required to perform V.I.P. dances whenever a patron requested one. The Club set the minimum price of these dances, which were to be performed in a specific area, and Lewis had to give a portion of that payment to the Club. Lewis's rotation on stage was determined by the Club and it chose the music for those performances.

[411 S.C. 640] The Club required the performers to follow specific guidelines or risk being fined or immediately discharged. Because this Club was topless only, the dancers were subject to fines for removing their panties. Although the Club did not set times when the dancers were required to work, it did devise a dancing schedule once the women arrived and they were not allowed to leave prior to the end of their shift without paying a fine. Furthermore, if a dancer did not perform on stage during the assigned time, she had to pay a fine. Failure to pay any fine or repeated violations of the rules could result in termination. Additionally, the dancers could be dismissed for fighting or having sex in the Club.

During Lewis's shift at the Club, a fight broke out and Lewis was struck in the abdomen by a stray bullet, which caused severe damage to her internal organs and resulted in the loss of a kidney. She also sustained substantial scarring. Lewis filed a claim for workers' compensation requesting temporary total disability benefits and medical treatment from the date of the accident. The putative employer was not represented at the hearing, but the South Carolina Uninsured Employer's Fund appeared to dispute Lewis's claim, arguing Lewis was an independent contractor and not an employee.

Page 395

At the hearing, Lewis argued the Club exercised control over the manner in which her work was performed, and she was therefore an employee of the Club. She testified she earned $357 the night she was shot, and made a total of $1,357 at the Club over the course of her shifts. Lewis did not state what her income was at the other establishments where she danced, but stated she made approximately $250 to $350 a night. She had never filed a tax return and produced no documentation indicating where she worked or what her total income was.

The single commissioner found that Lewis was an independent contractor and denied compensation. Additionally, the commissioner stated that had Lewis established she was an employee, her compensation rate would be $75 per week based on Lewis's failure to produce evidence of the income she earned at other establishments. The appellate panel of ...


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